Hopped And Confused w/ Tokyo Police Club, The Trews, Hollerado, Yukon Blonde

Hopped And Confused w/ Tokyo Police Club, The Trews, Hollerado, Yukon Blonde

Said The Whale, Dilly Dally, New Swears, Sam Coffey and the Iron Lungs

Saturday, August 26, 2017

1:00 pm (event ends at 12:00 am)

Mill Street Ottawa Brew Pub

Ottawa, ON

$35.00

Friday - The Trews, Yukon Blonde, Said The Whale, Sam Coffey and the Iron Lungs

Saturday - Tokyo Police Club, Hollerado, Dilly Dally, New Swears

 

The Trews
The Trews
Yukon Blonde
Yukon Blonde
After their final European tour in support of their 2015 album, On Blonde, Yukon Blonde were not ready to come home - so they didn't. Frontman Jeff Innes relocated to Madrid, Spain where he was joined sporadically by his bandmates to write new material. Over beers at Restaraunte Padron, in the gardens of the El Retiro, and from a one room apartment on San Bernardino, Malasana, “Crazy” and “Emotional Blackmail” were born.

These two new songs were produced by Yukon Blonde and Steve Bays (Hot Hot Heat), and will be available everywhere digitally on July 28 via Dine Alone Records.

"The idea for the song came about just before a show in Munich at the end of the tour,” says Jeff Innes. “I was just outside of the club and I could hear the rest of the band sound checking one of our songs. I had the chords mixed up in my mind so it sounded like a completely different tune. As I was humming this melody outside, I was simultaneously trying to think of what to say to defend my slightly erratic behaviour to a girl I had met in Spain. And so as I was writing to her, I ended up writing the lyrics to the song.”
Hollerado
Hollerado
Hollerado's debut album Record In A Bag came out in 2009 and received a Canadian JUNO award
nomination for Best New Artist. Their incredible “Americanarama” video garnered over 1.4 Million
YouTube views with its forcefully creative approach to video making, and the album spawned the Top 10 radio hits “Americanarama” and “Juliette” as well as Top 20 radio hit "Got To Lose." The launch of White Paint followed, their 2013 studio release, which included the Top 10 song and video for “So It Goes,” a wrenchingly personal story about lead singer Menno Versteeg's Dutch grandfather, whose life was spared in World World II. Hollerado's band ethos is spent building a music community of music loving fans, so it's no surprise that 2015's 111 Songs was a project where they wrote custom songs for specific fans. This exhaustive continuous songwriting project built the working framework for the release for their new single, “Born Yesterday, which hints at the sheer energy of musical and creative offerings to come from the band in 2017.
Tokyo Police Club
Tokyo Police Club
For a band that burst on the scene with an ecstatically received 16 minutes of music (2006's A Lesson In Crime EP) followed in rapid fire succession by additional EPs and singles (Smith, "Your English Is Good") and a debut album (2008's Elephant Shell) all in under two years time, you'd think 26 months between albums would be an interminable wait. And it might well have been for Tokyo Police Club, had they not toured relentlessly in support of that first album through August of 2009 — and started writing new songs virtually the second their previous record was put to bed.

So the nine month gap between the close of that tour and the June 8 release of Champ, Tokyo Police Club's second full length album and first for the mom+pop label, has been anything but boring or unproductive. Quite the opposite in fact: The Newmarket Ontario quartet ended up happily immersing itself more fully in its craft than ever: Greg Alsop (drums), Josh Hook (guitar), David Monks (vocals, bass) and Graham Wright (keys/percussion) challenged and redefined their songwriting and performing chops and techniques from day one of pre-production, and, together with producer Rob Schnapf (Beck, Elliott Smith), ultimately created the defining record of their career to date.

By the band's account, not a second was wasted in getting to the genesis of the material that would become Champ. "Naturally we started writing really early," Monks recalls, particularly in the case of "Breakneck Speed," the first peek at Champ that the band would eventually stream at http://tokyopoliceclub.com/. "'Breakneck Speed' was written right after we finished mixing Elephant Shell. After that, writing came really gradually. Then by summer 2009 we realized we had eight or nine songs and we headed to New York to demo them and start pre-production. When we came home after that, the momentum was there and we kept writing and didn't stop until we finished that November."

All of which explains why numerous Champ highlights will be familiar to those who've caught Tokyo Police Club from dates on their last headlining tour through this year's appearance on Coachella's main stage, from the epic slow burn of album opener "Favorite Food" to the irresistible shuffle of "End of A Spark" to first single "Wait Up (Boots of Danger)"--whose hypnotic refrains made it onto Champ just under the wire. "Yeah that one almost didn't make it onto the record," says Monks. "I remember writing the chorus on the way back from demoing in New York and finishing it when we had about three weeks left. It was close."

While fans are sure to be pleased by Champ's familiar live staples and other tracks in the signature Tokyo Police Club vein that the Los Angeles Times likened to "being in love for the first time, in musical form—that kind of rush," the album's more experimental and adventurous tracks shine just as brightly. The fruits of Champ's hard labor combined with intriguing hints at that band's future musical excursions make tracks like "Gone" and "Not Sick" essential listening. The former was the result of a summer-long weekly songwriting challenge between Dave and Graham that was never intended to yield music for the LP, he explains: "First thing every morning we had to write a little song and record it to send to the other. The only rule was that it had to be entirely on the spot. So one Wednesday I came up with 'Gone' and it it grabbed Graham enough to bring it to the band. What we came up with almost didn't make sense—the different parts, the strange time signature—until Greg came in with his contribution: a beat that made everything fall together really naturally and easily. And suddenly it was a song. And 'Not Sick,' for whatever reason, was the hardest song we ever had to do."

That said, it's always the most natural talents always make excellence look effortless. And Champ is no exception, thanks in large part to the instantly simpatico relationship the band struck up with Rob Schnapf. "So many producers feel a need to leave their imprint on a band or record," says Monks. "With this record, we'd gotten to a place where we were happy with our own voice as a band, so why would we do dilute it or compromise it? We needed to find someone to help us best express that voice and Rob's help was invaluable in getting that across."

Tokyo Police Club took its first baby steps toward finding that voice with its formation in 2005. The band was off and running the following year, releasing the debut EP A Lesson In Crime to instant and universal acclaim. One more EP (Smith), a digital-only single ("Your English Is Good") and a few world tours later, Tokyo Police Club's first full length album, Elephant Shell was released in April 2008. Elephant Shell's release was preceded by multiple sold out shows in New York, Los Angeles, San Francisco and Toronto, and followed by appearances on The Late Show With David Letterman, The Late Late Show With Craig Ferguson and, bizarrely enough, Desperate Housewives. Critical response to the full length was even more enthusiastic and diverse, with the likes of GQ ("Strokes-caliber catchiness"), Elle ("a smart, furiously played sugar-rush debut"), Rolling Stone ("poised to become the biggest Canadian export since Molson") and more giving thumbs up. The guys circled the globe in support of Elephant Shell for approximately a year and a half, finally coming off the road in August of 2009.

All of which brings us to Tokyo Police Club unveiling Champ to ears and eyes the world over, as the band embarks on a tour as special guests of Passion Pit that will take them through the end of June. Barely hours after that tour concludes, the boys will kick off a headlining tour that will find them headlining through the summer, combining Champ material with the numerous fan favorites in their live set. "There's really not one thing to sum it up," says Monks of the record. "Musically we didn't follow any kind of framework or preferred kind of song. Any direction we went is a direction that just felt fun.

"Or you could say," he concludes, "It just sounds like us."
Said The Whale
Said The Whale
Vancouver's Said The Whale has been on a steady upward trajectory for the past six years, as relentless touring and a prolific string of releases have led to successes including a JUNO Award in 2011 for New Group of the Year and nationally charting singles. In 2013, the tireless five-piece will continue to break down doors by releasing its most adventurous and hook-filled batch of songs yet.

The band formed in early 2007 and, following some early EPs, released the debut-full length Howe Sounds/Taking Abalonia in 2008. Said The Whale began to amass a grassroots following through frequent tours, and they scored a string of Canadian radio successes with the albums Islands Disappear (2009) and Little Mountain (2012). These albums earned attention from media outlets like Spin, BBC 6 Music, and Consequence of Sound, and the band was profiled in the nationally televised CBC documentary Winning America. Said The Whale has been nominated for two more JUNO Awards in 2013 for Alternative Album of the Year and Recording Package of the Year (alongside art director Andy Dixon) for Little Mountain.

In keeping with this inexhaustible work ethic, the band is releasing another new collection of songs in the form of the four-song I Love You EP, due out June 18, 2013, on Hidden Pony Records. Once again teaming with longtime studio collaborator Tom Dobrzanski (We Are the City, the Zolas) at his Monarch Studios, the musicians pushed their musical limits and honed their love of fast, punchy pop-rock.

"In the past I've felt pressure to write 'radio' songs, or 'cool' songs or whatever, but this time I went into the writing process with mindset of 'Fuck everything, I'm just going to write what makes me happy,'" says Tyler Bancroft, explaining that the songs were written with a clean slate and no expectations. Ironically, what resulted were some of Said the Whale's catchiest, most accessible songs yet. The singer observes, "It turns out I just like pop music."

This affection for melody shines on I Love You's title track which is led by a surge of post-punk guitars and careens between spiky choruses and a sunny, sock hop-inspired bridge. Elsewhere, the Worcester-sung "Barbara-Ann" is a buoyant blend of heartfelt romance and '60s-style vocal harmonies, while "Mother" is a synth-heavy new wave banger. These upbeat songs were mixed by Canadian studio guru Gus Van Go (Hollerado, the Stills).

"I spend so much time chipping away at my thoughts, trying to get to the core, and right now I'm finding it easy," Worcester says. "I've never felt more creative." He adds that the lovestruck mood of "Barabara-Ann" was inspired by a couple who own a hammock store in Vancouver. "It's a proposition to someone special, suggesting that we too can live together like this this beautiful pair of chilled out lifers," he reveals.

The EP offers a taste of Said The Whale's fourth album, due out this fall. These latest sessions found Bancroft taking on the role of co-producer, and he guided each song in bold new directions without adherence to genre. "Rather than record in one big session, we used the 'hip-hop method' of doing two or three songs at a time," he reflects. "This let us focus all of our energy on each song without getting overwhelmed."

The new material was penned in a surge of creativity that found Bancroft and Worcester letting their guard down and following their instincts. "My songs on this album are the most vulnerable songs I've ever written," notes Bancroft. "Lyrically it's the most honest I've ever been."

I Love You EP is the sound of a band already on the top of its game breaking free from all expectations and boldly reinventing its identity. And with a new full-length close behind, expect to see more new sides to Said The Whale soon.
Dilly Dally
Dilly Dally
For twelve years Katie Monks and Liz Ball have been connected through music. A sister-like bond that requires no words. The two Toronto-based musicians met in high school over a common love of legendary bands like The Pixies, scrawling lyrics and poetry to mimic their heroes. Both self-taught guitarists, Ball and Monks also idolized the lackadaisical sorrow of Kurt Cobain, Christopher Owens and Pete Doherty, slowly manifesting that admiration into their own band they called Dilly Dally.

"We started a band because we believed in ourselves," says Monks, "and we believed in Music--almost like it was a religion."

That whole-hearted, delusional blind faith is what brings any musician to a point of both contention and success: you do not care, but you care so much it hurts. The reality of today's industry is long-cycle touring, frivolous press duties, tweets by the handful that paint life wealthier than it is and a mouth of Ramen, but what differs today is that those who pursue a band do it because they really, really need to. There's no promise of an easy, stress-free future. The feeling is intrinsic, an obsession that cannot be traded in for a bigger bankroll. In the last six years of "being drenched in the Toronto music scene," Dilly Dally found inspiration while doing the early 20's struggle of "working shit jobs, being in debt, partying too much and hustling in a band." When you rely on music for anything but love, it spits you out like poison and Dilly Dally are aware of this.

Dilly Dally's debut album Sore is heavy and melodic. The record has nods to Sonic Youth, Yeah Yeah Yeahs, The Distillers, and even The Pogues. Monks calls it "All that and a bag of weed." After years of rotating members (Ball and Monks have traded out three drummers and bassists), they have settled with Benjamin Reinhartz and Jimmy Tony. The combination resulted in a debut that sweeps the listener along into Monks' psyche, as she screams in a coarse holler that chameleons, sliding in cadence and scale. Monks paints pictures of snakes crawling out of her head, while Ball adds simple, sparkling guitar leads that cut through the wall of fuzz and pedals. Reinhartz's drumming is instinctual, driving forward, while Jimmy Tony carries the melody along with his simple and effective bass lines. Dilly Dally plays like one person, a unit that works to infect the audience. After a few choice singles and a 7", the band's debut is strong work, due in part to production from Josh Korody (Fucked Up, Greys) and Leon Taheny (Owen Pallett, Austra, Dusted).

"Josh literally introduced me to pedals," admits Monks. "He is obsessed with guitar sounds and helped us carve out the textures we wanted for our songs. Leon is great at looking at the big picture. Giving the songs what they need, and bringing clarity to the moments that needed it. Making that record was just six friends working our asses off together, having fun, and having serious talks about life and shit."

Sore is a dynamic album that rarely lets up. The pop sensibilities shine through the noise. This is what makes Dilly Dally feel like an updated version of the quiet-loud-quiet simplicity coined by the Pixies and mimicked by Nirvana's fleet. The opening track "Desire" details a great sexual release, while instant hits like "Purple Rage," "Next Gold," and "Snake Head" challenge menstruation, self-reinvention after heart break and band dynamics – and Canadian cigarettes. Sore is a youthful, charmingly green manifesto that grabs the listener even further with the guidance of a lyric sheet.

"Lyrics are so, so important to me," says Monks. "But singing them clearly is not close to as important to me as the feeling of the vocal performance." As a young music lover, Monks loved having to research the lyrics of the band she loved, digging through to find out what her icon was actually talking about, never fully knowing. "The lyrics are often more like me talking to one of my best friends. Passing on important messages that I think they should know about. Music has always been my best friend, so our songs are meant to be that for someone else."

With choice reviews from Pitchfork, FADER and Noisey as well as commendable performances at festivals like CMJ and NXNE and a growing fan base outside of their Canadian east coast home, Ball and Monks are ready to embark on tour and figure out the ropes along side their bandmates, who have been around the block a million times over in their previous projects.

"Music, to me, is a cultural conversation happening all the time – and I wanna be a part of it. Listen to what others are saying, and respond...it all connects to what is going on in the world. We came from the suburbs with complete naivety, and blind faith in our dreams," says Monks. "We still have that blind faith, I guess. Perhaps, we are less naive."
New Swears
New Swears
Ottawa's New Swears are announcing their signing today to Dine Alone Records with the premiere of a video for "Brand New Spot," the A side of the Brand New Spot/Sugar Heavy Metal 7 inch, which will be released by the label on November 4th.

The 7 inch is the first release from New Swears since their 2014 LP Junk Food Forever, Bedtime Whatever, which brought the band attention for the first time outside of their hometown, garnering praise from Pitchfork, Noisey and Exclaim among others, and introducing audiences to their unique brand of garage pop, a combination of delicately-calibrated, melodically-focused pop song writing delivered with the energy and enthusiasm of a punk band. That enthusiasm is on full display during their high-energy live sets, which the band brought across North America and Europe in support of the LP, building a reputation as a singularly entertaining live act, playing over the top, freewheeling shows as likely as not to feature impromptu human pyramids, off-the-cuff halfway-ironic Bruce Springsteen medleys, and to end in injury to one or multiple band members as the result of their alcohol-fueled amateur acrobatics.

Since the album the band have been hard at work, initially in their shared home, the semi-legendary Ottawa DIY venue known as The Fun Boy Club House (RIP), writing a new collection of songs that will comprise the next LP. "Brand New Spot" hints at the direction the album might take while providing a succinct introduction to New Swears individual charms, delivering a densely packed collection of hooks in a brisk 2 and half minutes, that touches on subjects like stealing mom's liquor, avoiding the cops, teenage love and the paralyzing pull of nostalgia, recalling both the Buzzcocks and Jesus of Cool-era Nick Lowe, if Nick Lowe and the Buzzcocks were a bunch of self-identified skids from Ottawa.
Venue Information:
Mill Street Ottawa Brew Pub
555 Wellington St
Ottawa, ON, K1R 1C5
http://millstreetbrewery.com/ottawa-brew-pub/